Kevin Rudd's wife wins Human Rights Award

Therese Rein Feeding the chooks
Feeding the chooks

What a shock it was to see that the wife of former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, Therese Rein. was announced as the winner of the Australian Human Rights Medal for 2010.

Ms Rein, a multi-millionnairess in her own right apparently supports a wide range of issues including homelessness, Indigenous literacy, child health and disability. Are they Tax deductable???

Whatever her 'patronage' really is, she is living rich on stolen land and passing out a few bread crumbs to the true owners who largely live in third world conditions.

AAP ABC News 10th December, 2010

The wife of former prime minister Kevin Rudd, Ms Rein was announced as the winner of the Human Rights Medal for 2010.

Therese Rein has been awarded the nation's most prestigious human rights medal.

The wife of former prime minister Kevin Rudd, Ms Rein was announced as the winner of the Human Rights Medal for 2010.

In a statement, Australian Human Rights Commission president Catherine Branson said the businesswoman and mother of three was known for her patronage of major social causes in Australia.

"In her capacity as wife of the former prime minister, she was deeply and genuinely committed to a wide range of issues including homelessness, Indigenous literacy, child health and disability," she said.

The award was presented at the annual Human Rights Medals and Awards ceremony in Sydney.

Ms Rein dedicated the award to the less fortunate in the community.

"This medal belongs to those people who because of their disability have faced prejudice and assumptions from other people about what they can and cannot do," she said.

The Young People's Human Rights Medal went to the NSW Young Australian of the Year Jack Manning-Bancroft.

Mr Manning-Bancroft won the youth medal for establishing a mentoring program encouraging Indigenous people into tertiary education.

Jack Manning Bancroft

AAP Herald Sun December 10, 2010

... Jack Manning Bancroft, 25 - CEO of the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience - took home the Young People's Human Rights Medal.

"The challenge for everyone here is to start thinking of indigenous Australia and moving away from seeing it as an obligation to an opportunity," he said.

"If we want to stand on the world's stage we need to see this nation as a rich nation beyond 200 years of history to one of 60,000 years of history that we can all share in."

The young winner also proudly stated that AIME was now working with 1000 children across the east coast of Australia and the organisation aimed to have indigenous children finish school at the same rate as "every Australian kid and this can happen by 2020".

"Our mission is to be working with 6000 kids a year by 2020 and see every one of those kids finish school at the same rate as every Australian kid," he said.