Julian Assange issued a First Nations passport

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been offered an Aboriginal Nations passport in an inner-city Sydney ceremony after he was "abandoned" by Australian authorities.

His father, John Shipton, accepted the document at a celebration in Darlington today.

He said his son had been jilted by the Australian government, and the passport ceremony - which follows Ecuador's decision to grant Mr Assange diplomatic asylum - was a show of solidarity.

Assange gets an Aboriginal passport

AAP Sydney Morning Herald September 15, 2012

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been offered an Aboriginal Nations passport in an inner-city Sydney ceremony after he was "abandoned" by Australian authorities.

His father, John Shipton, accepted the document at a celebration in Darlington today.

He said his son had been jilted by the Australian government, and the passport ceremony - which follows Ecuador's decision to grant Mr Assange diplomatic asylum - was a show of solidarity.

$250,000 delivered to each First Nation family at a cost of $220,000

White public servants cost, per First Nations family, an average of about $220,000 a year. Under Macklin, each family averages only about $30,000, and, for many, even the spending of that is carefully and paternalistically ''managed''.

There are nearly two non-Indigenous public servants ministering to the ''needs'' of every family. That may be as many as 100,000 people, once one counts or fractions in health workers, teachers, policemen, social workers and the risk managers, bookkeepers, equal opportunity officers, army public relations people, human resource managers and co-ordinators-general required to keep their shows on the road. - 3 Articles

Kimberley heritage sold out by 'conspiracy of deceit'

Investigations reveal a trail of deceit in which records that prove the legitimacy of traditional Goolarabooloo lawman Joseph Roe's heritage claims have ignored and the Kimberley Land Council has also worked with Woodside and the state against the interests of some of its own clients.

Woodside has been prepared to tell the state government to withdraw warnings that it may be acting in breach of the law that could put its directors in jail. And the government has been happy to comply with its wishes.

Sovereign Union of First Nations is inevitable


Left to right: Michael Ghillar Anderson, George Gaymarani Pascoe, Dr. Djiniyini Gondarra

In a 'Sovereign Union' Media Release from Darwin, Michael Anderson said that he has completed discussions with Dr Djiniyini Gondarra and George Gaymarani Pascoe and they all agreed that a Sovereign Union of nations is inevitable, but it needs to grow from the grassroots and its success can only be achieved if the First Nations people want it.

"The Sovereign Union is about building a protective shelter while our people go through the hard long process of organising from the community level up," Michael Anderson explained. "Each of the sovereign Nations' sovereign independence dictates that they make their own rules about their own governance, while the Sovereign Union national unity government deals with national and international political agenda items that will be dictated to by the individual sovereign Nations.

WA under fire over stolen wages compensation

Stolen Wages

The West Australian Government is under fire over its compensation offer to pay lost wages to thousands of the state's Indigenous workers.

In March, the state government announced a six-month time period for former workers to apply for wages withheld by the government in what has become known as the stolen wages case.

Between 1905 and 1972, the government withheld up to three-quarters of the wages earned by workers on state-run Native Welfare Settlements.

The monies were put into government trust accounts with the promise that they would later be rightfully dispersed. But that never happened.

All charges against Musgrave fire defenders dropped on Aboriginal Sovereignty Day

The Brisbane Aboriginal Sovereign Embassy celebrates the dropping of all charges against those arrested in Musgrave Park on May 16 attempting to stop Brisbane City Council desecrating the sacred fire.

This is a victory for all Aboriginal people and our pursuit to assert our sovereignty over the land.

The embassy press release states, 'This isn't over and we are looking at all avenues to get justice for this unwarranted attack on our culture and on a sacred place'. Under the Cultural Heritage Act it is crime to interfere with or damage a registered cultural heritage site. The maximum penalty for this crime is fines up to $1,000,000 and imprisonment for up to 2 years.

Townsville professor blasts Australia over land rights and Intervention at international conference

An international conference in South Africa last month heard an Aboriginal woman professor from Townsville, Gracelyn Smallwood, blast Australia over land rights and the Northern Territory intervention ...

In an interview with Noosa Community Radio Gracelyn said she expects her three talks, based on her PhD thesis to go feral internationally. The thesis is to be published by a London publisher Routledge "because it was too hot a potato for Australian publishers" she approached.

First Peoples nations still struggling for their rights

pdf

UN processes are so slow it took two UN Decades for member states to reach an agreement on the political status of Indigenous rights. After the First International Decade of the World's Indigenous Peoples (1995-2004) failed to resolve contention over self-determination, the General Assembly had to expand the timeframe with a second UN Decade (2005-2015) under the theme "A Decade for Action and Dignity".

The controversy focused primarily on the practice of Indigenous autonomy - and its implications for state sovereignty. Most member-states reacted to Article 46 insisting that the declaration not be interpreted in any way that could impair the territorial sovereignty of states. Four governments voted against the declaration (Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the US) out of opposition to the majority's interpretations of sovereignty.

As Indigenous protests gain momentum, most governments fail to practice what they have committed to internationally

Women gather for Cootamundra Girls Home anniversary

ABC Riverina August 10, 2012

Indigenous women and their families from across Australia have started arriving in the Riverina for the centenary of the Cootamundra Girls Home.

Hundreds of girls were forcibly taken from their families and placed at the Cootamundra Domestic Training Home for Aboriginal Girls between 1911 and 1968, as part of the Commonwealth's assimilation policy. The girls were not allowed to contact their families and were later sent to work as domestic servants.

The governments said children had to be taken away from their parents because the influence of their own communities was immoral and they were in danger of abuse and neglect, but the real agenda then was to de-Aboriginalise them.